The Power Of Supporting Your People

Posted by Boyd Metals on December 20, 2018

Here’s a sad truth: We live in a recognition-deprived world of business. If you think we’re wrong, ask yourself, how often do you receive recognition for a job well done? While we hope that your answer is frequently, we have to look at the facts. According to a study done by David Novak, Former CEO of Yum,

82% of employees in America feel they aren’t recognized for the work that they do for their employers.

We at Boyd Metals believe this is unacceptable. Employees deserve to be commended for the work they do for you. Aside from this simply being the right thing to do, there are many benefits to giving your people the recognition they deserve. CEO of the Virgin Group, Richard Branson famously once said,

“Clients do not come first. Employees come first. If you take care of your employees, they will take care of your clients.”

Leaders who make a point to show recognition to their team stand to gain a significant return from this small gesture - a team that is renewed in their commitment to the leader of their organization and dedicated to helping their company thrive and succeed.

You were hired to be a manager to lead your employees. A leader is meant to set an example not to just give orders. To be a strong leader, you have to understand what it means to support your people.

Support Their Efforts

It should come as no surprise that people want to be supported in their efforts. As an employee, you come to work every day, you do the work as you were instructed, and you take on the stress of the job. It might seem too simple to even matter, but you wouldn’t believe just how far a “thank you” can go. Showing appreciation for the commitment that an employee makes to show up to work on time and do their job lets them know that you support the effort that they are putting in. 

Support Their Achievements

What do you do to applaud your employees for a job well done? How do you show recognition when someone hits their sales goals or goes the extra mile to assure that a project runs smoothly? Employees don’t have to be rewarded for doing their jobs, but if you don’t give recognition to employees that are getting things done, then you are failing to do your job.

Again, it doesn’t take much. Something as small as saying “good job” proves to your employee that you notice their hard work. Supporting your employees when they are achieving the goals that you have set for them is the least you can do when they are consistently helping you and your company succeed. 

Support Their Mistakes

This one is certainly the least common way that companies show support to their employees. But it speaks volumes to the employee when it’s done properly. A mistake has been made. Mistakes almost always cost the company either time or money and often times both. But the great managers of the business world understand one thing: mistakes provide opportunities to learn.

When a mistake is made, the employee that made the error is already feeling the guilt of the mistake. Depending on the situation, they are likely feeling embarrassed and insecure. While the mistake needs to be addressed so that it’s not repeated, nothing good will come from making the employee at fault feel bad. Instead, take a moment to remind them that they are supported and you are there to offer them guidance. In return, that employee will likely make more of an effort to not repeat the same mistake again.

At the end of the day, standing behind your employees will give them a reason to stand behind you. They are a reflection of your leadership after all. Take time to step away from your to-do list and instead, think for a few minutes about what kind of support your team needs from you. Because, when an employee feels supported by their boss they will align their goals with that of the company and everyone wins.



Here at Boyd Metals we not only value our employees, but our clients as well. Contact one of our locations today to see how our team can support you and your business goals. 

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Topics: Advice for Managers and Estimators